Writers’ Forum – second place

IMG_4664

Sue’s story ‘The out’, won second place in the April edition of the Writers’ Forum (out now).  The judge described it as ‘a chilling tale  of a woman torn by past loyalties and present dread.’  Originally shortlisted for a local crime competition, and with a year of drawer time, Sue rewrote it extensively before submitting. There’s a lot to be said for distancing yourself from a piece of writing in order to be able to look at your work critically.  It also helps to have a judge that understands what you’ve tried to do.

Advertisements

Flash Fiction ‘Envy’.

saturday-envy

Sue’s flash fiction appears in Pure Slush, the ‘Envy‘ edition.

“The twins reacted differently. I thought they’d be identical. / from No more Wonderland by Sue Dawes.

Sibling rivalry in under 300 words.

 

 

 

Writers’ Forum- 2nd place- October issue

41595846_10212736522351592_4110014871679008768_n

Sue recently won second place in The ‘Writers’ Forum’ short story competition, which meant payment and publication (the two most important things for a writer after the actual slog of imagining and editing a story).

So what is her advice to get your story noticed?

  • The first paragraph has to set up at least one question to engage the reader and it has to sustain their interest. This could be (and usually is) a dilemma the character is faced with.
  • The reader needs to be grounded. Where are we? Make it concise and if possible simple, unless your character is a place, in which case it will have layers all of its own (think of the ‘house’ in Rebecca or the film: Monster House).
  • The character needs motivation and emotion. We need to know who’s speaking and any dialogue must be believable but reduced to as few words as possible because no one speaks in full sentences.
  • There has to be a structure (but not necessarily beginning/middle/end in that order).
  • Unpredictable is good but no story should have an unexpected twist that hasn’t had any build-up (foreshadowing is a must). There’s nothing worse than feeling conned at the end.
  • The dilemma the character faces must be resolved.
  • A good story should leave you thinking, even if it’s a ‘how did I not see that coming?’  Personally, these are Sue’s favourite.
  • The style should be all your own.
  • A proof reader is a good idea because it’s very difficult to spot your own mistakes. If you don’t have this (many people write in isolation) an alternative method is to print out your story in a weird font.  It’s much easier to see any mistakes when the print looks unprofessional.  Duplicate words can be caught out by reading aloud.
  • Similies are great but only in moderation (a bit like everything).

Sometimes it takes a few submissions to get your story placed and that enforced ‘drawer time’ when the story is out there, is always positive.  Sue was lucky with this one but others she’s had published before, have been rejected and rewritten before acceptance by another publisher.

Good luck!

New postcard for WDTL

The poem, written by Sue Dawes, was designed to go with the picture of ‘Pearl’ , a graphite on paper portrait, of a young girl with plenty of attitude.  The artist is Robert Priseman.  Sue is working on a series of poems about ‘unspoken things’.  The postcard is available to collect at Firstsite and Wivenhoe Railway station.

New Postcard for Words-down-the-Line

Off the Rails Wivenhoe have produced a Spring postcard on the theme of ‘Woodland’, which is available to collect from the station and Firstsite (amongst other places).  The poem is by local writer Helen Ivory and the image is by local artist Olivia Browne (who is also displaying her work at the station gallery).   The card is produced by Sue Dawes.